Spring Bird Migration: South Branch of the Chicago River

I’m still amazed at the birds that stop on the heavily industrialized area of the south branch of the Chicago River between the Pilsen and Bridgeport neighborhoods (in Chicago, of course). Here we found ourselves in the evening of the second Friday of April.

Lesser Scaup and one Coot.

A coot attempts to blend in with the Lesser Scaup.

A Northern Shoveller feels anti-social.

A Northern Shoveller, with his broad eponymous bill, was the least social of the crowd.

The Double-crested Cormorant kept its distance but then did a fly-by.

The Double-crested Cormorant kept its distance but then did a fly-by.

A coot channels its inner flamingo.

A coot channels its inner flamingo.

While the shoveller seeks cover, the coots

While the shoveller seeks cover, the coots bask in the sun.

This section of the river is lined with heavy industry for miles in both directions; downtown Chicago is to the northwest.

This section of the river is lined with heavy industry for miles in both directions; downtown Chicago is to the northwest.

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Ashland Avenue, at 2600 South, crosses the river here. Trash lines both sides of the river. Imagine the bird and other wildlife if we took care of our waterways.

Those 'lesser,' these scaup are nothing to scoff at.

Though ‘lesser,’ these scaup are nothing to scoff at.

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